<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 29 Oct 2021, at 17:09, Bill Cole <<a href="mailto:macportsusers-20171215@billmail.scconsult.com" class="">macportsusers-20171215@billmail.scconsult.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="caret-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">Yes: Anyone running Mojave or earlier is not exactly skydiving without a parachute, but is doing something close. Perhaps it's akin to skydiving with a homemade parachute‚Ķ</span></div></blockquote></div><div class=""><br class=""></div>To be fair: given that Apple does not announce life cycle for older OS versions, they simply stop sending out security patches and you only find out ofter the fact, people running Mojave are in a slightly different situation.<div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">It only became clear very recently that Apple had in fact stopped supporting Mojave because there was no Mojave version of the most recent security patch. And while they stop sending out security patches, they do send out updated Safari versions for instance, in other words, it is a bit of a mixed message.<br class=""><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">G<br class=""><div class=""><br class=""></div></div></div></body></html>